Key Research Findings: the case for Cultural Learning

Our consultation with CLA members told us that you wanted evidence to make the case for cultural learning, and information on what is best practice and how to deliver it.

Using only evidence from cohort studies with large sample sizes (typically 12,000) and research with control groups we can emphatically say there are instrumental outcomes which cultural learning delivers

We have grouped these into ten key research findings:

  1. Participation in structured arts activities can increase cognitive abilities by 17%
  2. Learning through arts and culture can improve attainment in Maths & English
  3. Learning through arts and culture develops skills and behaviour that lead children to do better in school.
  4. Students from low-income families who take part in arts activities at school are three times more likely to get a degree
  5. Employability of students who study arts subjects is higher and they are more likely to stay in employment
  6. Students from low-income families who engage in the arts at school are twice as likely to volunteer
  7. Students from low-income families who engage in the arts at school are 20% more likely to vote as young adults
  8. Young offenders who take part in arts activities are 18% less likely to re-offend
  9. Children who take part in arts activities in the home during their early years are ahead in reading and Maths at age nine
  10. People who take part in the arts are 38% more likely to report good health

Detailed information and the source reports for each key finding can be found by clicking through the menus to the right.

Download Key Research Findings

Background

Based on consultation with our members, funded by the Paul Hamlyn Foundationand building on the work of the DCMS CASE review the Cultural Learning Alliance has conducted a wide ranging survey of existing English language data on the instrumental outcomes of cultural learning.

Our key research findings are designed for all our members to use to support, advocate for, and shape their own practice.